Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change

Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths and Promoting Change

Girl child education is an important issue for the girl, her family, and society as a whole. Education has been perceived as a tool to empower girls by giving them knowledge about their rights, health care needs, and opportunities for self-development.

This blog post will discuss girl child education in different parts of the world including India, China, and Africa. It will also debunk myths that people have about girls’ education.

It is a girl’s right to receive education. This is not just any girl, but every girl. It doesn’t matter if she lives in an urban or rural area, whether she has access to resources or not, what her religion may be – girls have the right to learn and grow into empowered women who can contribute positively to their communities and society as a whole. 

Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change
Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change

However, there are many myths that surround girl child education that needs debunking for these rights to be upheld.

This blog post will discuss why girl child education is important, dispel some common myths about girls’ safety in school environments and promote change through awareness of the issues faced by girls around the world today.

Girls are the most vulnerable to violence and discrimination around the world. They are twice as likely to die in childbirth, four times more likely to be illiterate, and three times less likely to attend school than their male counterparts. 

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    In developing countries, girls can spend up to 10 hours a day working on chores while boys have time for leisure activities. Girls make up 70% of all child laborers worldwide, yet they make up 50% of the global population. 

    If girl’s educational opportunities aren’t increased by 2020 there will be a shortfall of 170 million women with tertiary education globally- a situation that could hold back progress in many developed economies for generations

    The girl child is an active part of our future progress but her importance has been overlooked for too long.

    By ensuring girl child education, we are taking proactive steps to ensure that girls grow up knowing their rights and opportunities while also laying the groundwork for a better future world where equality is valued in society.

    Girl Child Education: Myths That People Have About Girl’s Education

    Many popular beliefs prevent us from recognizing the true hurdles. As a consequence, we underestimate the work it will take to bring every girl child in India to school.

    Myth 1: This problem applies only to rural India.

    Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change
    Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change

    Only 14 out of every 100 girls in our cities complete high school, according to a study published by Save The Children.

    While this is better than rural India, where only 1 in 100 pupils finish secondary education, it is still terrible. Even the Ministry of Human Resources’s statistics, which are based on school reports, reveals that just 33% of females complete class XII.

    This is not to discount the significant increases in enrolment, which has almost completely reversed the gender gap in primary school enrollment!

    Enrolment, on the other hand, does not imply that children attend or complete school.

    According to UNESCO research, Primary school attendance for girls is said to be 81 percent, while secondary school attendance is only 49 percent.

    Myth 2: The solution to the problem is more money.

    Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change
    Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change

    In the 1950s, funds were a problem, however public spending, especially on education for girls and women, has risen dramatically over the last two decades. 

    The World Bank reports that India spent 3.7% of its gross domestic product on education in 2015. This is not very different from the global average of 4.2%. Furthermore, some Indian states fail to spend their budgetary allocation each year.

    Less funding does affect girls more than boys as it typically implies less infrastructure. For instance, no separate bathrooms at school is often cited as a big reason for girls dropping out. 

    Although spending has increased, dropout rates and learning have not improved. Increasing expenditure on education has not made a difference when it comes to the learning levels of students.

    Myth 3: We can leapfrog poor school infrastructure with technology

    Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change
    Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change

    Education experts agree, not just in India but throughout the world, that teachers are the most important factor affecting learning outcomes in early education.

    “Children, especially in younger years, learn a lot from human interaction, collaboration, emotions, and verbal and non-verbal cues. Quality of teachers and teaching methods are the most important factors for learning outcomes.”

    Kiran Sethi, an Ashoka fellow, and educationist

    And what our schools lack is efficient and good teachers. Approximately 6,400 of these schools have no teachers, according to the government’s survey of 2014-15.

    In the face of incredible improvements in every industry due to technology, one often assumes the benefits would apply to education as well. In 2015, global venture capital funding for K-12 education technology passed $ 3 Bn, an increase of 48% from 2011-2015. 

    There is no denying that technology can create a significant impact on education. In rural Rajasthan, for example, the introduction of camera monitoring and linked salaries to attendance led to a 21% decline in teacher absenteeism. 

    A digital teaching system will undoubtedly change circumstances in the future. Currently, though, girls in India face more challenges regarding access than focusing on technology.

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      Myth 4: Better performances by girls in board exams suggest the problem may be self-correcting

      Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change
      Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change

      For boys, the average school year in 2010 was 6.1, while for girls, the average school year was 4.1. The gap between the two remains stark. 

      Despite the fact that girls score better in passing and merit lists than boys in almost every board exam in every state, part of the reason may be the high rate of dropouts. It’s estimated that nearly 20 million girls did not attend school in 2011.

      We have come a long way since India’s independence when girls’ enrollment was barely in double digits. Although the higher performance of girls tells us that they could accomplish a lot more, it also tells us what they are capable of.

      Our perception of these myths often leads us to believe that the issues around girl education are under control. The truth is, that’s not the case.

      According to a new UNESCO report on the status of global education, India is 50 years behind schedule when it comes to achieving universal education. 

      Progress is still slow despite efforts on the part of the public and social sectors. We face a deep-seated challenge – in our communities and in our cities – in ensuring that all girls receive an education.

      In addition to the right of girls to education, great strides need to be made towards enhancing the social status of girls.

      In addition to infant mortality and immunizations, UNICEF and WHO data indicate that future generations’ health is directly related to the education of women.

      Debunking popular myths and accepting the challenges head-on is the first essential step in making India a better place for girls. 

      Girl Child Education: Education And The Social Construct Of Gender Roles.

      The girl child has to break through many barriers before she can attempt to reach her full potential. One of the biggest issues is how people view girls and women in society. 

      The girl child must work against ingrained negative attitudes which create problems for them at school, home, and work – regardless of their economic standing or geographical location.

      For instance, girl children are often taught to be submissive, emotional, and not opinionated. 

      As a girl child becomes older these attitudes become more pronounced in society especially when it comes to working outside of the home or venturing into typically male professions such as engineering or medicine.

      Education is important because girls can contribute positively towards their country’s economy while also continuing to be active members of the society.

      Promoting girl child education and girl child safety is important for promoting positive change in the world.

      Girl Child Education: The Importance Of Educating Girls In India, Africa, And Latin America.

      Myth: Girls’ education and girls’ safety is a problem that primarily exists in India. It is not only an issue for the developing world, but it has become more prevalent throughout middle-income countries as well such as Brazil, Mexico, and Russia. According to UNESCO data from 2016, there are 39 million girls out of school globally.

      Girls are the future leaders of their countries and they need to be educated, safe, and empowered. Educating girl children helps them become more aware of their surroundings which also enables them to voice their opinions rather than remaining silent due to fear or ignorance. 

      Girl’s education affects everyone – not just girls themselves! It is imperative to educate girl children because they can contribute positively towards their communities, families, and countries as educated girls tend to have fewer pregnancies which result in healthier mothers. 

      Educated girl children also grow up into healthy women who are more likely to fully participate in society by voting, running for office, working outside the home, etc. Education is a powerful tool!

      In the developing world, girl’s education is more important than ever. 

      In India alone, there are almost 79 million girls who do not attend school – leading to a large gender gap in literacy rates of 28 percent between men and women.

      It is imperative for girl children to be educated because they could potentially improve their families’ socioeconomic standing by working outside of the home.

      Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change
      Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change

      Girl Child Education: How To Promote Change By Promoting Education For Girls.

      In order to improve girls’ education, many different measures should be taken. Some of them are…

      • Improve the quality of school infrastructure (i.e., separate bathrooms for girl students)
      • Provide financial incentives to encourage parents to send their girl children to schools; and
      • Educate girls about HIV/AIDS, family planning, etc. educating young girls today will benefit their countries tomorrow.

      Promoting girls’ education is an important step towards promoting global stability and peace in the world!

      Girl Child Education: Ways To Help A Girl Get An Education.

      – Sponsor girl in education

      – Educate girl child about their rights

      – Do not give gifts to girl children that promote gender roles (i.e., toy kitchen sets)

      – Gyan dan; educate them for free be it in academics or skills.

      – Start near your home (with your maids or their children). Remember goodness spreads like fragrance. Eventually, with time you’ll be reaching out to more kids.

      -There are many ways in which people can help girls get an education without donating money – including encouraging girls’ self-esteem, introducing them to role models, and providing girl children with opportunities to explore their interests.

      Educating girls today will help them become leaders of tomorrow! It is important for girls’ education to be prioritized because girls are the future generation.

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        Girl Child Education: What Can We Do?

        I measure the progress of a community by the degree of progress which women have achieved.

        Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar

        Women empowerment empowers every individual in a country! We must begin by protecting the girl child, ensuring that her birth is celebrated, and that she receives all the care and love she needs to reach her full potential. 

        We should ensure every woman has the opportunity to achieve her full potential. When we empower girls, we celebrate them, protect them, and educate them. 

        As our daughters are empowered, their communities are empowered, which means our nation is empowered! Here are some important measures we need to take:

        • The community and family should welcome and celebrate daughters not only on designated days and festivals but by spreading awareness and changing mindsets.
        • All girls should have access to education.
        • Provide a safe environment for women and support women in their fight against violence.
        • Promote recognition of women in the workplace among society, private enterprise, and government.
        • Reduce care work by identifying, redistributing, and redistributing.
        • Work for decent wages, equal pay, and a safe working environment for women.
        • Access to the property in the will, including the house and the land, must be provided for women.
        Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change
        Girl Child Education: Debunking Myths And Promoting Change

        Girl Child Education: Support Those Who Support Them

        If you don’t have time and want to bring about a positive change then support those who support them.

        Anirs Kids Fashion Show

        AKFS strongly believes that education is the only path to enabling a more prosperous and stronger nation. They welcome those who are like-minded to join them to help support Girl Child Education by forming Balika Vidya Army.

        Kiddomentoring

        Kiddomentoring gives a level playing platform to all kids to learn beyond scholastic and believes mentoring is a two-way process. We host  activities and talk shows for kids, We have helped arrange books and other stationery items too

        Unnati

        UNNATI means progress for all. Almost five years ago, a seed named ‘ UNNATI ‘ was sown by the three ladies (Ms. Anita Sharma, Ms. Nidhi Singhal, and Shreen Vardhan Sharma) in sector 41 Noida. Since that day they have been working diligently to teach underprivileged children. They not only focus on curricular but also on co-curricular activities.

        Motherhood Club

        Motherhood Club is a group for mommy education empowerment and enlightenment. We are helping mothers and women come out of their shells making them aware of health wealth and hygiene along with parenting and many other aspects

        Aarambh Trust For Women And Children

        Mrs. Cheena Goyal founded a charitable trust titled “AARAMBH TRUST FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN” in 2014 with the support of Mrs. Ishpreet Sahani and Mrs. Vinu Sharma.  AARAMBH’s vision also attracted like-minded women to this Fantastic Four. 

        Girl Child Education: Why Should We Care About Educating Girls?

        Educating girl children helps them become more aware of their surroundings which also enables them to voice their concerns rather than remaining silent due to fear or ignorance. Girl’s education affects everyone – not just girls themselves! 

        It is imperative to educate girl children because they can contribute positively towards their communities, families, and countries as educated girls tend to have fewer pregnancies which results in healthier mothers. 

        Educated girl children also grow up into healthy women who are more likely to fully participate in society by voting, running for office, working outside the home, etc. Education is a powerful tool!

        In the developing world, girls’ education is more important than ever. In India alone, there are almost 79 million girl’s who do not attend school – leading to a large gender gap in literacy rates of 28 percent between men and women. 

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          It is imperative for girl children to be educated because they could potentially improve their families’ socioeconomic standing by working outside of the home.

          Promoting girl’s education is an important step towards promoting global stability and peace in the world!

          Girl children today are our leaders of tomorrow – it is important to educate them because they can contribute positively towards their communities, families, and countries as educated girl’s tend to have fewer pregnancies which result in healthier mothers. 

          Educated girl’s also grow up into healthy women who are more likely to fully participate in society by voting, running for office, working outside the home. Education is a powerful tool!

          Girl Child Education: Ways To End Gender Discrimination And Promote Change

          Girl Child Education: Ways To End Gender Discrimination And Promote Change
          Girl Child Education: Ways To End Gender Discrimination And Promote Change

          Ways to end gender discrimination and promote change for the betterment of all people, including girls, include:

          – promoting girl’s education by providing financial incentives to parents, improving school infrastructure (i.e., separate bathrooms for girl students), and educating girls about HIV/AIDS, family planning, etc.;

          – encouraging girl’s self-esteem and independence;

          – introducing girl children to role models; and

          – giving girl children opportunities to explore their interests.

          Today girl children are the future generation – it is important for girl’s education to be prioritized because girl’s are our future leaders and educators. 

          Promoting girls’ education will help them become more aware of their surroundings which also enables them to stand up regarding their problems they might face rather than remaining silent due to fear or ignorance. 

          Offer ways in which people can help promote change – including donating money, volunteering at a school or organization supporting girls’ education, and raising awareness by sharing this blog post with friends and family members who have girl children.

          In the developing world, girl’s education is more important than ever as it can affect everyone – not just girl children!

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            Girl Child Education: What Is Keeping Girls Out Of School?

            Ways To End Gender Discrimination And Promote Change
            Ways To End Gender Discrimination And Promote Change

            Education is difficult for girls for a number of reasons. Feudalism, disasters, poor health and sanitation, and cultural practices are among the many issues exacerbated by poverty, leading to insurmountable barriers for girls’ education.

            Famine and drought

            Water and food shortages are not new phenomena, but they have become so severe in recent years that many developing countries have declared a state of disaster.

            The majority of sub-Saharan households do not have access to drinking water is collected by women and children.

            More and more girls today walk a longer distance to fetch water for their families – and this water is often contaminated or unhygienic.

            There’s a possibility she will be too tired or hungry to concentrate in class, or that she will be too sick to attend class at all.

            Health and sanitation

            A lack of hygiene and sanitation affects all school-aged children, but girls are most affected by inadequate facilities.

            When girls begin menstruating, many schools lack safe latrines or unsanitary water supplies, making it impossible for them to remain in school.

            Girls are sometimes prevented from attending school due to the lack of proper sanitation and laundry facilities that are separate and private.

            Cultural norms and practices

            Despite their desire to attend school, girls are frequently prevented from doing so. In many cultures, education is largely viewed as a male privilege.

            Educating a girl may not be seen as a priority by parents and community leaders, who believe it is not needed for her primary roles as a wife and mother.

            Cultures like child marriage can stop girls’ education even if they start school. Many women drop out of college to focus on domestic responsibilities or to raise their children.

            Girls who aren’t in school face greater risks of becoming child brides: Those who aren’t educated are 3 times more likely to marry before the age of 18.

            In many impoverished families, child labor is their only option to survive. Thousands of children go unnoticed, out of sight, and out of reach of those who should be protecting them.

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              Family caregivers and domestic workers are perhaps the most invisible of all women. According to data, children work 9 to 18 hours per day under harsh working conditions around the world.

              They spend more time working during the day rather than in the classroom where their education belongs.

              Many students with the privilege of attending school still face difficulties accessing it. 11-year-olds have to walk 4 kilometers to get to a classroom in India. 

              Distance and cost

              A classroom’s physical location can present its own challenges. Across many developing countries, the nearest primary school to a particular community can be four or five hours away by foot.

              Children traveling long distances to school alone is a concern of many parents. To get into a classroom, girls face danger, violence, and abuse.

              Despite the fact that primary education should be free, there are often costs associated with it that prove too burdensome for struggling families.

              A girl in a family with more than one child often loses out on textbooks, school fees, uniforms, or transportation.

              Crisis and conflict

              During periods of social and political crisis, girls are especially vulnerable to violence and war, which disrupt education for all children.

              In the aftermath of natural disasters or epidemics, many families suffer insurmountable losses, and education pales in comparison to simply surviving.

              One in four out-of-school children in the world lives in crisis-affected areas.

              Ways To End Gender Discrimination And Promote Change
              Ways To End Gender Discrimination And Promote Change

              Girl Child Education: Summary

              Norms and culture must change. Girls are still not encouraged to pursue STEM fields, as a result of which, they take on low-paying, unstable jobs, thus perpetuating the cycle of inequality.

              As a woman, a man, a citizen, or an individual, it is our responsibility to ensure she has every opportunity to realize her potential.

              Empowering girls begins with celebrating, educating, and protecting them. By empowering our daughters, we are empowering their communities, which ultimately means empowering the entire nation!

              Creative Quest: International Online Talent Show | Season-2
              Creative Quest: International Online Talent Show | Season-2

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